Friday, August 10, 2018

TDA? TFS? Whatever ... I've got it

By Bob Gaydos

Donald Trump is messing with my journalistic instincts. How do I know? Well, I never got past the headline of the Facebook post that informed me psychologists were diagnosing something new among their patients, informally called TAD -- Trump Anxiety Disorder.

I never bothered to read the article. Of course they are, I said to myself. What took them so long? The whole damn country is suffering from it. We’re one, big, herky-jerky mass of resentment and anxiety just waiting for the next tweet to make us great again. Or have us at each other’s throats.

I recognize the symptoms in myself every morning when I wake up and remember that the sorry excuse for a human being called Trump still lives in the White House and millions of Americans are apparently OK with that. I’ve also been told that acceptance is the key to serenity and that I don’t have to like the situation to retain my sanity, just accept that it is. So I’ve now given up trying to figure out or reason with the Trumpsters. The universe and history will deal with them.

But as someone who has been trained and conditioned over time to write about such things as a colossal upheaval of the moral underpinnings of the supposed defender of democracy, equality and justice on the planet (i.e. the United States), I also feel obliged to try to write despite the angst. To report, if you will, on the latest outrage. But really …

There’s no keeping up. Pick a topic. Is it Korea, Russia, the wall, trade wars, utter incompetence, lies, NATO, Iran, hush money for sex with porn stars, China, lies, kneeling football players, the queen, racism, ignorance, attacks on reporters, lies, Hillary, tax cuts for the rich, boorishness, caging immigrant kids, nepotism, the budget deficit, witch hunts, lies …?

It’s all different, yet all the same. Follow the bouncing ball. Three-card Monte. What did he just say? So, while I may have Trump Anxiety Disorder, I think I’m also suffering from what the mental health professionals call a co-occurring condition -- Trump Fatigue Symptom.

It’s downright tiring writing the same thing over and over again: Dotard did/said something dumb or cruel, or both. Then he lied about it. Republicans didn’t care (they’ve committed suicide) and his loyalists cheered. End of story.

The end of story I’m hoping for, of course, is one written by Special Counsel Robert Mueller: Trump led out in handcuffs, along with his family and cronies. But I’m also looking for a good read in a chapter to be written in November — the midterm elections. If there’s not a big Blue Wave vote for Congress, TAD will become epidemic I fear.

Meanwhile, someone who cares about me and is curious about the true meaning of life (it's not politics or baseball, I’m told), has steered me to some people who seem to have a pretty good handle on it. Eckhart Tolle. Mooji. Rupert Spira. Deepak Chopra. Tom Campbell. Thanks to YouTube, they are helping me to change my outlook, maybe even lower my anxiety level.

The key is simply to be, these enlightened men say. I am not my thoughts. I am not even my body. Consciousness (not the Dotard) is in charge. All I have is now. Be present. (Have lunch with my sons.) Meet everything in the moment. Be aware of being aware. (Do all-you-can-eat sushi every Sunday.) Lower the entropy (disorder) in a system (consciousness) and increase the cooperation, order, caring, even love. There are no coincidences.

This is all a virtual reality, says Campbell, a physicist. In that case, I want to be the player in charge of the Dotard’s avatar. I think I could bring plenty of energy to that experience, appreciate every moment and lower the entropy of the entire planet.

It’s working slowly.

Also, please vote Democrat.

rjgaydos@gmail.com

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Video games are addictive, officially

Addiction and Recovery
By Bob Gaydos
Some young males may be addicted to video games.
What many parents the world over have been proclaiming for quite some time is now official: Some individuals -- mostly young males --- are literally, not just figuratively and annoyingly, addicted to playing video games. That is the determination of the World Health Organization, which after considerable study and debate, recently added gaming disorder to its International Classification of Diseases, a primary source of information for doctors worldwide.
The United Nations agency did not put a time frame (how many hours a day) on what would be considered addictive gaming, but rather, put video gaming in the same category as gambling addiction -- a behavior that becomes “a priority” and which the individual is unable to stop despite numerous negative life consequences. These include loss of a job, loss of friends, broken relationships, poor health, bad grades and other assorted issues that might arise for someone who played, say, Fortnite, the current video game rage, for 14 to 16 hours a day while neglecting work, school, food, sleep, family, friends, showers … real life.  
While this classification might seem overdue to some, it is not without controversy. For one thing, the W.H.O. zeroed in on video gaming, both online and offline, but did not include use of the internet and smartphones, which certainly are vehicles for obsessive behavior. For another, the American Psychiatric Association did not include gaming in the fifth edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, choosing to call it a "condition for further study."
Some critics of the WHO classification suggest that gaming was targeted because of heavy lobbying by some countries, such as China and South Korea, which have large populations of video gamers and are desperately looking for help in treating them. But some mental health professionals say official WHO designation could improve public education, research, insurance coverage and development of treatment programs, which at the moment are scarce and expensive. They say including the gaming industry -- with its legion of experts on creating reward-and-reinforcement scenarios -- in the conversation can only help.
Not surprisingly, most creators of video games (who have an economic motivation to be considered) and their legion of players responded negatively to the classification, arguing with the methodology of some studies and saying the results have been far from conclusive. They also say studies on gaming are relatively new and note that some studies have shown benefits to playing video games, including improved thought processes (lots of strategy to figure out), greater motivation (lots of levels to reach and competition to be won), and improved memory and hand-eye coordination (essential for good gaming). In these regards, they say, gaming is akin to young people playing sports or joining clubs.
Finally, there is also disagreement among mental health professionals about whether the gaming is the cause or the effect of such common co-occurring disorders among obsessive gamers as anxiety and depression.
Still, whether it is an official mental health disorder or one deserving further study, no one argues that playing video games to the point that the player suffers negative consequences in other areas of life is good for one’s health. So, while the APA has not classified gaming as a disorder, it has come up with nine criteria for identifying it, should it make that official decision. They are similar to those used to identify other officially classified addictions:
  1. Pre-occupation. Do you spend a lot of time thinking about games even when you are not playing, or planning when you can play next?
  2. Withdrawal. Do you feel restless, irritable, moody, angry, anxious or sad when attempting to cut down or stop gaming, or when you are unable to play?
  3. Tolerance. Do you feel the need to play for increasing amounts of time, play more exciting games, or use more powerful equipment to get the same amount of excitement you used to get?
  4. Reduce/stop. Do you feel that you should play less, but are unable to cut back on the amount of time you spend playing games?
  5. Give up other activities. Do you lose interest in or reduce participation in other recreational activities due to gaming?
  6. Continue despite problems. Do you continue to play games even though you are aware of negative consequences, such as not getting enough sleep, being late to school/work, spending too much money, having arguments with others, or neglecting important duties?
  7. Deceive/cover up. Do you lie to family, friends or others about how much you game, or try to keep your family or friends from knowing how much you game?
  8. Escape adverse moods. Do you game to escape from or forget about personal problems, or to relieve uncomfortable feelings such as guilt, anxiety, helplessness or depression?
  9. Risk/lose relationships/opportunities. Do you risk or lose significant relationships, or job, educational or career opportunities because of gaming?
Obviously, the more “yes” answers there are, the more likely the individual has a problem with video gaming, whether it’s labeled an official addiction or not. Denying it out of shame or guilt or fear won’t help. In fact, the WHO classification is intended to eliminate those obstacles and provide an avenue to help. If the video gamer has trouble stopping or cutting back, consider consulting a professional addiction counselor.
There is also help available online from those who understand the problem because they’ve been there:
-- On-line Gamers Anonymous, a 12-step, support and recovery organization “for gamers and their loved ones who are suffering from the adverse effects of excessive computer gaming”: olganon.org
-- Computer Gaming Addicts Anonymous (CGAA), “a recovery fellowship, based on the model of Alcoholics Anonymous”: cgaa.info.
Whatever you do, be honest. If you or a loved one are talking about it, if it is a cause for concern, if it has caused problems, then it’s a problem, official addiction or not. Don’t wait for the debate to be resolved.
It’s all in the game
  • About 2.6 billion people play video games worldwide.
  • Two-thirds of American households include video game players.
  • The great majority of those who play video games do not display addictive behavior.
  • Young males log more hours weekly on video games than do young females.
  • The Entertainment Software Association says annual worldwide revenue for the industry should reach $180 billion by 2021.
  • Fortnite: Battle Royale, the current hot video game in which 100 players battle to be the last one standing on the island, recently earned a reported $300 million in one month. It has a reported 40 million-plus players, some of whom are obsessive. The game is free to play, but players can buy add-ons (weapons, tools, resources, etc.) to enhance their chances of victory.
 bobgaydos.blogspot.com

Friday, July 20, 2018

'Enemy of the people'? Not the press

By Bob Gaydos

The next day's paper.
I began my most recent column lamenting that this all-Trump-all-the-time insanity we are experiencing has sucked much of the joy out of life and made it difficult to write a “normal” column. “This has become personal,” I wrote.

Little did I know.

A week later, an angry white male with a shotgun and a history of threats shot and killed five people at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Md. For a brief time in my career, I was managing editor of the Evening Capital, which the Baltimore Sun later bought and merged with the Capital’s sister paper, the Maryland Gazette.

When I saw the first report on the shooting, I had an “Oh my God” moment. Who? But I quickly did the math and realized that, having left Annapolis more than 40 years ago, the odds that anyone I worked with was still there were slim to none. Also, the paper had long moved from its old offices on West Street -- a convenient walk to the State Capitol, Governor’s Mansion, Historic District, the Naval Academy and City Dock   -- to a modern building farther from downtown.

Still. People were shot at The Capital, I said, processing the information, and Donald Trump keeps calling the press “the enemy of the people” and conservative commentators and “pundits” keep issuing warnings about the media’s “time being up.”

This is not only not normal, this is dangerous because the most rabid followers of Trump and the media-bashers include some people with a violent nature who are looking for any excuse to use the guns they are hoarding to attack the “enemy” as fingered by their leader. That includes, at the top of the list, those who report the facts.

For Trump, that means anyone who points out his daily lies, mistakes, failures and contradictions and their impact on the rest of us. The so-called mainstream media. The big guys, to him. But to many Trump followers, that label translates to any journalist anywhere, including Annapolis.

This is classic government by fear-mongering. Angry white males keep slaughtering school children in America and newspapers report the facts and, in many cases, publish editorials and columns calling for more responsible gun laws. Trump, after first acting like he agrees with the need to pass sensible gun restrictions and criticizing Republican congressmen for being “afraid of the NRA,” then gets in bed with the NRA and points his finger at “the enemy” -- the press -- for reporting “fake news.” “Defend the Second Amendment!” shout the zealots. “It’s the press’ fault!”

They apparently never heard of, or don’t care about or understand, the First Amendment, but I think most Americans do. I also think most Americans are a bit spoiled and lazy about understanding and appreciating what Freedom of the Press means to them.

It means that reporters in Annapolis, for example, can keep readers informed on meetings of local groups and schools, report on city council or state legislative action, local sports news, the status of the Chesapeake Bay and changes at the Naval Academy and editorial writers can offer reasoned opinion on the news of the day, unswayed by political or business interests.

Does this happen so purely every day at every paper in every community in America? Of course not. But I believe it it does in most. I am convinced by more than a half century of working with journalists that getting the story right and telling it the best way possible is still the primary objective.

For most journalists, the pay is good, but not spectacular. The ego is fed by the byline. The job is alternately fun, interesting, boring, challenging, stressful and always unpredictable, which may be the best part.

I mentioned I was managing editor of The Capital briefly in the 1970s at the height of the Watergate scandal. The unpredictable happened to me one morning when I was news editor. At the regular morning news meeting, the managing editor and editor got into an argument over something of great import of which I no longer have any memory. The managing editor abruptly stood up and said, “I quit!” and marched out the door of the editor’s office. Without missing a beat (at least that’s how I remember it), the editor pointed to me and said, “Gaydos, you’re managing editor.”

I eventually left Annapolis with that good personal story and wound up in Middletown, N.Y., another small city with a lot of good local journalists telling readers what was going on in the area. Among other things, I wrote editorials calling for sensible gun control laws, not repeal of the Second Amendment. Those sentiments continue to be expressed in the local paper and reporters and editors continue to do their best to serve the public, operating with sharply reduced resources due to an industry-wide corporate culture that is more interested in maximizing income than increasing the news hole.

Those newsroom people may irritate a politician occasionally, but as I see it, that’s part of the press’s responsibility of telling the truth. They are not, however, the enemy of the people any more than the five employees of the Capital Gazette who were gunned down in Annapolis. Just average Americans doing their jobs.

Words have power. When those in position of power use words recklessly -- and Trump does so routinely -- innocent people can be hurt. The facts speak for themselves. The Amendments to the Constitution are in order for a reason. People should not have to live in fear for speaking or writing the truth. That’s what makes America great.

I have many memories and mixed feelings about my time in Annapolis. It’s a great town. In the end, it’s all part of my story. But I am saddened by the newspaper’s -- the city’s -- loss and I hope and pray that more Americans wake up soon to the real enemy of the people.

bobgaydos.blogspot.com


Sunday, July 1, 2018

Yes, Melania, I obviously care a lot

By Bob Gaydos
The coat.


This has become personal. This waking up daily with a feeling of incredulity, depression, bewilderment, sadness, anxiety, anger, fear, loathing and profound resentment. This thing, this overwhelming syndrome, this " this suck-the-joy-out-of-life condition called the Donald Trump presidency. It's real, but it's not normal. And try as I may to act as if it's not there, to "get on with life" as it were, I inevitably wind up back at the same place, wishing it weren't.

It used to be, just a couple of years ago in fact, that writing a blog was, for me, a freeing experience. It was just like writing a newspaper column or daily editorial, except you didn't get paid for it. On the other hand, you had absolute, unlimited choice of topic, from soup to nuts to " well let's just stay there for a minute.

There was a time, again, not so long ago, that I relished the opportunity to craft an entire blog (column) around a throwaway cliche like "soup to nuts." What's that all about? It was fun and informative for me and I tried to make it the same for readers. After all, life can't just be the same, old, umm, rat race.

Then came Trump. All Trump, all the time.

All of a sudden, I found myself arguing with myself:

"No one wants to read about the worst new food idea."

"Sure they do. They need a break from the dotard just like I do."

"But can you really get a whole column about the fact that the world isn't ready for -- doesn't really need -- chocolate hummus?"

"Yes. It's a dumb idea. The question is do I have the energy to spend the time and will it seem trivial? I mean, did they have to add all that sugar? What were they thinking? It could be a health column. People like those."

"Seriously?"

"Maybe not. So maybe I should also forget about writing about what a dumb idea rectangular coffee cups are?"

"Probably."

"But honestly, did the geniuses try drinking with the cup before manufacturing it? Try wrapping your lips around that rim, folks. And why would a diner, which arguably owes its existence to providing people with coffee to get them through the day, want to make it harder for them -- us ... well, me -- to do so. And could they at least make it a full-size mug for Pete's sake? Is everyone looking for a quick buck?"

"No one cares."

'Well, I care."

And so, it seems, I've come back to the World of Trump. That coat that the mute Melania wore to cheer up the children from Central America whom her husband had ordered locked in cages after taking them away from their parents who were bringing them to America to escape violence in their homelands and to find hope for better lives. What a cruel, evil, ignorant policy. What a cruel, evil, ignorant man.

"I really don't care, do u?" was the message on Melania's coat. Trying to figure out her real message, of course, was just another diversion from what was actually going on, but its inappropriateness again highlighted the ineptitude that co-exists with the callousness of this family, this administration.

And what else was going on at the time? Trump, as usual, was blaming Democrats for his lock-the-kids-up policy, while also waging war against immigrants, documented or otherwise, and holding campaign rallies to energize the like-minded, ill-informed, fear-based supporters of his cult, officially known as the Republican Party.

Conservative columnist George Will, having left the party, now urges all Americans to vote for every Democrat they can to save the country, because Republicans can't or won't. A little late, George, but welcome. Republicans, of course, have lost their courage, morals, principles and all sense of what legislating for the common good means. They want to gut Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security and prevent people with pre-existing conditions from getting health insurance because they ballooned the national debt by giving rich people a huge tax break.

Of course, Trumpsters don't care or don't care to know about what's really going on and I've written so often about it that, well, Dotard Syndrome. Turn on Fox; turn off brain.

Aside from a trade war with U.S. allies, one other thing was going on while Melania was wearing her stylishly dumb coat -- the Trump team, which has been busy shredding laws and regulations that protect Americans from unscrupulous, greedy corporations, was in the process of drawing up a reorganization of the entire government. From soup to nuts, as it were.

I can't tell you how relieved I am that a man who has "reorganized" three casinos, two casino holding companies, a phony college and the Plaza Hotel into bankruptcy, all while milking them for every penny he could get, is planning on reorganizing the entire federal government to make it more efficient -- which is to say, less useful and unconcerned with those whose daddy didn't give them a million bucks to get a head start in the world. He and his cohorts and enablers, of course, will take their profits where they can.

As Melania might say, "Let them eat chocolate hummus."

Do I care? Obviously, more than I wish I had to.

(Editor's note: "Soup to nuts" as defined in Wikipedia: " 'Soup to nuts' is an American English idiom that conveys the meaning of "from beginning to end." It is derived from the description of a full-course dinner, in which courses progress from soup to a dessert of nuts." But of course, my readers already knew this.)

bobgaydos.blogspot.com

Saturday, June 30, 2018

'Survey' says: It's the media's fault


By Bob Gaydos


There I was, minding my own business (sort of), scrolling through my Facebook news feed trying to find a video on the Yankees game sandwiched in among all the posts about ICE agents snatching kids away from their parents at the border, Scott Pruitt using his security detail to fetch him lotion and the trending, new puzzle -- "Where's Melania?" -- when the ad grabbed my attention.

Did I want to take the "Mainstream Media Accountability Survey''?

Huh? The what?

Who the heck is conducting this survey? I blurted to no one in particular.

It didn't take long to find out. The ad, I was informed by Facebook's new, better-late-than-never policy of full disclosure, was "Paid for by the Trump Make America Great Again Committee, a joint fundraising committee authorized by and composed of Donald J. Trump for President, Inc. and the Republican National Committee."

Swell.

In the process of telling Facebook to never send me another post from the Trump MAGA Committee, I asked Facebook (as it now also allows me to do) how I even got this targeted ad -- I'm familiar with targeting Facebook ads -- in the first place.

Facebook offered two possibilities:

I shared the views of Trump MAGA. Uh, you could probably know that wasn't true within 10 seconds of scrolling my wall.

The committee was targeting individuals between the ages of 18 and 65 living in the United States of America. That would be known as a pretty loose target audience, geography wise, but I fit. However, I have aged out of the age parameters, so Facebook messed up anyway. Your algorithms still need work, folks.

At any rate, being a longtime member of said "mainstream media," I was hooked. I had to check out the "survey."

George Orwell would have been proud; George Gallup not so much.

Here's the first question: "Do you trust the mainstream media to put the interests of Americans first?

Yes

No

No opinion

Other, please specify:"

Loaded much? Remember, it's supposedly targeted to like-minded individuals. As surveys go, this one evidenced the Trump team's view of the scientific method: Ignore it.

Question number two: "Do you trust the mainstream media to report fairly on our presidency?" Same choices.

Then, in order: "Do you trust (NBC, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News) to report fairly on our presidency?" Same options.

If you're sensing a pattern, you are correct. It's all in the same vein as Der Leader's message: These people are really untrustworthy enemies of the people, aren't they?

Here's just one more question, to demonstrate what passes for policy in the Trump GOP: "On which issues does the mainstream media do the worst job of representing President Trump? (Select as many that apply.)"

 Immigration

 Economics

 Radical Islamic Terrorism

 Pro-life values/social issues

 Religion

 Health care

 Second Amendment rights"

Note -- "the worst job" as the operative choice and "as many as apply." Nothing like piling on, folks.

The questions get more ridiculously slanted as the 25-question "survey" goes on. I fully expect the results to be proudly posted on Facebook and bantered around Fox News, With any luck and if Facebook follows my instructions, I won't see them. But millions will and, again, those people who buy anything Trump sells will believe it and I'm pretty sure the Mainstream Media isn't going to come out too well.

In the same week this ad appeared, Trump came late and left early at the G7 meeting of top world economies in Canada, but not before wrongly accusing Canada of burning down the White House in 1812 and threatening to cut off trade with our staunchest ally and largest trading partner while insisting Russia, which was booted out of the group after "annexing" Crimea, should be allowed back in.

Then Drumpf headed to Singapore where he intended to conduct negotiations on nuclear weapons with North Korea's leader Kim Jong-un by sizing up his opposite number in the first minute or so via "feel." It was also reported that Dennis Rodman, the former NBA star and reputed friend of Kim, was heading to Singapore, perhaps to play second fiddle to Kim as he once did for Michael Jordan. Trump had John Bolton as his sidekick. Rodman has the size, but I'd bet anything Bolton uses his elbows under the boards.

What's the point of all this? Well, maybe that, under Trump, the real, the true, the factual, the serious business of life has become demonized and trivialized to the point that everything is treated as a reality TV show and millions of Americans are -- for reasons no one has yet explained to my satisfaction beyond sheer ignorance and bigotry -- hooked. Those videos of children being snatched from parents and locked up by ICE? Not true, say Trumpsters. Media lies. Or, if true, then necessary, the attorney general says, because " as if there could be any legitimate "because."

The Republican Party as a functioning political organization has ceased to exist. Trump makes it up as he goes along and scapegoats anyone who points out his lies, ignorance, pettiness, greed and other overwhelming deficiencies. But the "survey" will come out and it will confirm his claims of bias by the mainstream media and it will be posted on social media and mailed to all white people in America likely to vote for Trump because that country with the strongest economy ever, that country that promises freedom and opportunity to all, that country so many "other" people are willing to risk losing their lives -- or their children -- in order to live in, needs to be made great again.

Survey says Betsy DeVos can relax. The dumbing-down of America is well under way.

bobgaydos.blogspot.com

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

How to spot a food-related addiction

Addiction and Recovery


By Bob Gaydos

The list of substances or behaviors to which adolescents can become unhealthily attached, even addicted, can seem endless to a parent inclined to be caring and protective: alcohol, smoking, drugs, gambling, video games, social media, internet, cell phones, sex, shopping, eating …

Wait, eating you say? Yes, eating. Or food. It depends. There’s a debate over whether the problems are the same thing. Some say that someone who craves the same food, say sweets or salty chips, and consumes it in unhealthy amounts might be considered a food addict, a term not universally accepted, but one that is useful in defining a behavior. The food in question reacts on the brain in the same way that alcohol or another drug would. It rewards the person, who feels good.
Some say that someone for whom eating -- anything and plenty of it -- is a fulltime job with significant negative consequences might be considered to have an eating addiction, rather than a food addiction. Eating may provide the same kind of escape and temporary excitement that gambling, for example, would in someone else. An irresistible reward.
And, of course, these harmful behaviors often co-exist. Addictions may have biological, psychological, or social causes, or, likely, a combination of them.The focus here is not on debating the food/eating addiction question, but rather on recognizing that food addictions and eating disorders -- a different category of self-destructive behavior, including anorexia, bulimia and binge eating -- can often be ignored in teens when there is so much talk in media -- social and otherwise -- about drinking and driving, opioid abuse, the pros and cons of marijuana and the rest of that list.
Teens eat, adults say. Sometimes they eat a lot. Maybe a lot of junk food. They’re growing. So what’s the big deal?
Maybe nothing; maybe something. A primary goal of this column is to provide useful information to help readers identify and get help for addictive behavior and some studies say up to 10 percent of Americans may have a food-related addiction or disorder. One in 10 female teens may have an eating disorder. A smaller percentage of teen boys, perhaps athletes such as wrestlers or runners, also have issues that revolve around body weight and image. What follows are some symptoms and questions to help you decide if you or someone you know, perhaps a teenager, has a health issue involving food.
The following are possible symptoms of a food addiction:
  • Gorging
  • Eating to the point of feeling ill
  • Going out of your way to obtain certain foods
  • Continuing to eat certain foods even if no longer hungry
  • Eating in secret
  • Avoiding social interactions, relationships to spend time eating certain foods.
  • Difficulty functioning in a job or school due to decreased efficiency
  • Spending a significant amount of money on buying certain foods to binge
  • Obesity
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Sleep disorders, such as insomnia or oversleeping
  • Headaches
  • Irritability
  • Digestive disorders
  • Thoughts of suicide
Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous, a 12-step group that seeks to help people with food addictions or disorders, offers its own quiz to help people determine if they have a problem with food. As always, answer as honestly as possible:

  1. Have you ever wanted to stop eating and found you just couldn't?
  2. Do you think about food or your weight constantly?
  3. Do you find yourself attempting one diet or food plan after another, with no lasting success?
  4. Do you binge and then "get rid of the binge" through vomiting, exercise, laxatives, or other forms of purging?
  5. Do you eat differently in private than you do in front of other people?
  6. Has a doctor or family member ever approached you with concern about your eating habits or weight?
  7. Do you eat large quantities of food at one time (binge)?
  8. Is your weight problem due to your "nibbling" all day long?
  9. Do you eat to escape from your feelings?
  10. Do you eat when you're not hungry?
  11. Have you ever discarded food, only to retrieve and eat it later?
  12. Do you eat in secret?
  13. Do you fast or severely restrict your food intake?
  14. Have you ever stolen other people's food?
  15. Have you ever hidden food to make sure you have "enough"?
  16. Do you feel driven to exercise excessively to control your weight?
  17. Do you obsessively calculate the calories you've burned against the calories you've eaten?
  18. Do you frequently feel guilty or ashamed about what you've eaten?
  19. Are you waiting for your life to begin "when you lose the weight"?
  20. Do you feel hopeless about your relationship with food?

A “yes” answer to any question could indicate a problem with food, the group says.

Obviously, these are complex issues with serious -- even life-threatening -- potential consequences that need to be addressed as early as possible by trained professionals. There are a variety of programs and organizations to turn to If you suspect a food-related problem. Consult your doctor to begin with and check any of the accompanying links for more information.

For help
-- www.foodaddictsanonymous.org
-- www.recoveryfromfoodaddiction.org
-- www.foodaddicts.org
-- www.oa.org
-- www.eatingdisordersanonymous.org
-- www.nationaleatingdisorders.org
-- www.nimh.nih.gov
-- www.mentalhealthamerica.net
bobgaydos.blogspot.com